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Home Repairs & Servicing Clutch/Flywheel  Clutch/Flywheel Explained
Clutch and Flywheel explained - Newcastle Under Lyme

Clutch/Flywheel Explained

If you drive a manual transmission car, you may be surprised to find out that it has more than one clutch. And it turns out that automatic transmission cars have clutches, too. In fact, there are clutches in many things you probably see or use every day: Many cordless drills have a clutch, chain saws have a centrifugal clutch and even some yo-yos have a clutch.

Clutches are useful in devices that have two rotating shafts. In these devices, one of the shafts is typically driven by a motor or pulley, and the other shaft drives another device. In a drill, for instance, one shaft is driven by a motor and the other drives a drill chuck. The clutch connects the two shafts so that they can either be locked together and spin at the same speed, or be decoupled and spin at different speeds.

In a car, you need a clutch because the engine spins all the time, but the car's wheels do not. In order for­ a car to stop without killing the engine, the wheels need to be disconnected from the engine somehow. The clutch allows us to smoothly engage a spinning engine to a non-spinning transmission by controlling the slippage between them.

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